Masthead

Our pick of the pops, August 2010

Vote for your favourite or comment on these tracks using the forms at the foot of the page.

 

Wilma Goich

Dream love

In Germany – where foreign sounds were all the rage – Italian singers such as Mina and Rita Pavone had been taken to the country’s collective bosom. So it was probably only a matter of time before new Italian star Wilma Goich was asked to record specifically for the German market. Dream love was penned by established writers Henry Mayer and Kurt Hertha. Our guess is that they had been listening to The Supremes’ Where did our love go immediately before they sat down to write this track, but we don’t mind. (If you like the sound of this, check back next month when we’ll publish a full profile of Wilma Goich with lots more great sound clips.)

 

Jenny Wren

Chasing my dream all over town

Jenny Wren was the stage name of Dudley schoolgirl Jenny Allen. She got her big break when she was spotted by Fontana A&R man Jack Baverstock. As a result, she was offered a contract with the label in 1965. This single, issued in 1966, failed among the plethora of records coming out at the time, though the young singer did get to appear on stage with Manfred Mann and Wayne Fontana. The record has since found favour on Britain’s northern soul scene, and a mint copy now commands over £300. (Those with less cash to flash will be pleased to know it is available much more cheaply on the CD The girls are at it again, which is available from Amazon and others.)

 

Séverine

Rien qu’une fille

It takes a brave woman to take on an Aretha Franklin track. But France’s Séverine did just that with the US star’s Natural woman – and pulled it off convincingly. She’d already proved herself quite the determined singer, after surviving a short-lived contract with Vogue under the name Céline. She landed a new recording deal in 1969, with Philips, and our choice is taken from her debut disc for the label. The highlight of her career came in Dublin in April 1971, when she won the Eurovision song contest with the beautiful Un banc, un arbre, une rue. The song became a hit across Europe and launched a brief run of successes in France and a longer and more lucrative career in Germany.

 

Adriángela

Nunca hay bastante

Between 1965 and 1968, Adriángela was one of the Zafiro label’s ye-yé darlings. Born María José Guillén Torres in Valencia in 1942, she joined Iberofón in 1961 and switched to EMI a year later before really finding her feet at Zafiro. Though she lacked the sex appeal – and success – of rival singers such as Karina or Rosalía, she managed to cut an impressive 12 singles and four EPs for the label. Our pick is from her third EP, issued in 1965. Brief stays at both Sintonía and Fidias at the end of the decade and into the 1970s failed to repeat her earlier success.    

 

Tawny Reed

I’ve got a feeling

Cardiff girl Tawny Reed was pitched as the new Lulu by her record label, Pye. The gutsy-voiced 17 year old had been discovered by the same team who’d found Tom Jones. They introduced her to Tony Hatch, who dropped her backing group, The Flower Pot Men, when he whisked her off to London to record this track. It became the B-side of her take on Motown girl group The Velvelettes’ Needle in a haystack. The single was also released on New York’s legendary Red Bird label.

 

Meri Marabini

C’è tante gente

Meri Marabini fancied herself as pop’s answer to Cruella de Vil, judging by her hairdo. Perhaps hairdon’t would be the more appropriate term. Either way, if her intention was to stand out from the crowd, she achieved her aim, though it didn’t translate into record sales. Her debut disc, recorded at the age of 18, was a cover of the Beatles’ I need you, Mi manchi, with the Hollies’ You know he did, È proprio inutile, on the reverse. But the beat babe from Bologna is probably best known for Sono io la tua donna, her take on the Pretty Things’ Come see me. Our choice, though, is this, the B-side of her 1967 single Una voce.

Hear Wilma Goich Dream love

 

Dream love

Hear Jenny Wren Chasing my dream all over town

 

Chasing my dream all over town

Jenny Wren

Hear Séverine Rien qu'une fille

 

Rien qu'une fille

Hear Adriángela Nunca hay bastante

 

Nunca hay bastante

Hear Tawny Reed I've got a feeling

 

I've got a feeling

Hear Meri Marabini C’è tante gente

 

C’è tante gente

Meri Marabini

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Our pick of the pops

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Tawny Reed - You can't take it away Séverine - Mama dis-moi pourquoi Adriángela: Recordar EP Wilma Goich: Dream love Jenny Wren: Chasing my dream all over town Meri Marabini: Una voce