Masthead

Our pick of the pops, December 2008

Suzanne Doucet

Sei mein Baby

All too often when you think of walls and 1960s Germany, an image of the Berlin Wall is the one that springs to mind. But we shouldn’t forget the other wall – the wall of sound. German singer Suzanne Doucet certainly didn’t when she took on the Ronettes’ Phil Spector classic Be my baby and added a Teutonic twist. Within a few years, she found herself recording in London with Les Reed, Tom Jones’s producer, and later, a move to the US helped her achieve recognition as an authority on new age music.

 

Adrienne Poster

He doesn’t love me

The singing career of Brit girl Adrienne Poster – or Posta, as her surname was later spelt – is largely overlooked. Which is a shame, as this fab track from 1965 demonstrates. She soon ditched singing for acting, appearing alongside Lulu in the classic film To sir with love and then in a lead role in the film version of Up the junction – ironically, taking a part that had been offered first to the very same Scottish songstress. If you want to know more, check back next month, when we’ll be publishing a full page on Adrienne.

 

Luisa Casali

Il momento della verità

Milanese singer Luisa Casali took this song to Italy’s Cantagiro song contest in 1967. Her recording of the song became the A-side of one of a string of releases on the Fox label in the mid-to-late 1960s. Other highlights of her time with the label include the original of Dusty Springfield’s Give me time, plus covers of Bobby Hebb’s Sunny and Simon and Garfunkel’s The sound of silence. We’ve included those – and others – in a profile we’ve published of Luisa this month.

 

Michèle Torr

Te esperaba

French singer Michèle Torr – justifiably – had high hopes for the song Ce soir je t’attendais when she appeared at the Eurovision song contest in 1966. She was representing neighbouring Luxembourg, which had won the contest the year before, thanks to France Gall. Such was Michèle’s record company’s belief in the song, that she also got to record it in English, German, Italian and, here, Spanish. Sadly, it finished a lowly tenth on the scoreboard on the big night, but that didn’t stop Michèle’s career in its tracks. Phew.  

 

Ann Sylvan

If you got a heart

Issued in November 1965, this disc sees Danish doll Ann Sylvan taking on a Bobby Goldsboro tune, of all things – and making a better job of it than the US star, we reckon. Ann was born in March 1947 in Copenhagen and cut her first record, You thrill me, at the age of 17, with backing from the Red River Rock Boys. She promoted this later release during a stint as the support act for Herman’s Hermits on a tour of Denmark. Interestingly, the B-side was a version of Sandie Shaw’s Message understood.

 

Adèle

Et la la la la

This Adèle hasn’t been chasing pavements. Or indeed pies. No, this little-known lovely was a French chanteuse whose talents extended beyond singing to, erm, whistling – a skill she puts to great use on the EP our choice is taken from. The disc was issued on the Barclay label and is perhaps better known for J’ai peur parfois, C’est bon and Je ne veux plus d’accordéon, which have appeared on the Femmes de Paris compilations. Thanks to Ready steady girls! visitor Eric for reminding us just how good the mysterious Adèle was.

0 Bar small Hear Suzanne Doucet Sei mein Baby Hear Adrienne Poster He doesn't love me Hear Luisa Casali Il momento della verità Hear Michèle Torr Te esperaba Hear Ann Sylvan If you got a heart Hear Adèle Et la la la la

Our pick of the pops

Suzanne Doucet

Sei mein Baby

Adrienne Poster

He doesn't love me

Luisa Casali

Il momento della verità

Michèle Torr

Te esperaba

Ann Sylvan

If you got a heart

Adèle

Et la la la la

Adrienne Poster - He doesn't love me Michèle Torr - Te esperaba Luisa Casali - Il momento della verità Suzanne Doucet - Das geht doch keinen etwas an Adèle: J'ai peur parfois Ann Sylvan: If you've got a heart